Weary Gulf Coast mayors say hurricane season has changed for the worse, which many attribute to climate shifts

Weary Gulf Coast mayors say hurricane season has changed for the worse, which many attribute to climate shifts

That hurricane season has already jumped into Greek-letter storms — having exhausted the alphabet by mid-September — is a testament to how unusual the weather has been in 2020, and there are more storms lining up across the Atlantic. In the towns that have been slammed, there is an acknowledgment from civic leaders that something has changed for the worse. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner (D) said his city has had to repeatedly prepare for and respond to major weather events in recent years, including 500-year floods that hit in consecutive years, in 2015, 2016 and 2017, when the devastating effects of Hurricane Harvey flooded the city. He’s watching Tropical Storm Beta closely — while not predicted to be severe, he said, “every system, every storm, every hurricane is different. And what we have seen is that these storms can intensify very, very quickly.” “Climate change is real,” he said. “Years ago, you would not have had a mayor of Houston — the energy capital of the world — talk openly about climate change. . . . If there’s any question on whether climate change is real, take a look at all the weather systems that have developed this year alone. We have gone full circle in terms of the alphabet.” “The past couple years have proven that this may be a trend that we’re going to see more of, and I think cities all along the coast may be affected in one way or another,” he said, as Tropical Storm Beta threatens the city in coming days. “There’s no ...
More on: www.washingtonpost.com