Supreme Court ruling in Louisiana case sets back abortion foes' hopes of overturning Roe v. Wade

Supreme Court ruling in Louisiana case sets back abortion foes' hopes of overturning Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court's 5-4 decision to strike down a restrictive Louisiana law is far from the final battle by abortion opponents in their fight to overturn Roe v. Wade. Sponsored by an anti-abortion Democrat, Louisiana Act 620 was passed in 2014. State Sen. Katrina Jackson contended that its requirement that abortion providers have admitting privileges to hospitals within 30 miles of their clinic would protect women. Challengers of the law, however, said the restriction would leave just one abortion provider at one clinic in a state with more than 4.5 million residents. "This case was not about decriminalizing abortion or overturning Roe vs. Wade. I have a path that looks at that," said Jackson. "But I also know that I have a responsibility as a woman, as a legislator, to make sure that when a woman elects to have an abortion, while Roe vs. Wade is still the law, that they have safe choices." The case before the Supreme Court, June Medical Services LLC v. Russo, was nearly identical to a Texas case the court struck down in 2016. In Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, it held that a state's admitting privileges requirement did not advance women's health and imposed an undue burden on women seeking an abortion. Louisiana lawmakers, with the help of the anti-abortion organization Americans United for Life, pursued the law claiming the facts were drastically different than in Texas. "If something had happened to me, you'd better believe that I would've wanted to be ...
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