Spider-Man: Toei Crafted One of the Best Adaptations of the Hero's Origin - Despite Censors

Spider-Man: Toei Crafted One of the Best Adaptations of the Hero's Origin - Despite Censors

Welcome to Adventure(s) Time's 125th installment, a look at animated heroes of the past. This week, we're revisiting what has to be the most accurate retelling of Spider-Man's origin, though it happened to appear in an unexpected place. And if you have any suggestions for the future, let me hear them. Just contact me on Twitter. Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends didn't have much of a life after its airing, but it tends to be fondly remembered by fans of the era. The series featured character designs from John Romita and other comics artists, replicating much of the look of an early '80s Marvel comic. The kid-friendly premise had Spider-Man joined by Firestar and Iceman as his crimefighting pals (an attempt by the network to crib Super Friends' success) who share a secret crime lab inside Aunt May's home. The menaces aren't terribly menacing, and the show's no more dangerous than anything else on Saturday morning of the era. One episode, however, pushed the bounds of what the censors would allow. And surprisingly featured a stylish anime look that blends well with the traditional Western superhero aesthetic. Debuting on Oct. 2, 1982, is "Along Came Spidey," from writer Don Glut and director Don Jurwich. The anime styling of the episode is evident from the opening and almost as prevalent as the billboard advertising a Daily Bugle exposé on Spider-Man from none other than Stan Lee himself. The opening sequence has the Shocker, in his television debut, escaping ...
More on: www.cbr.com