Netflix's 'Space Force' minimizes Trump's mistakes with poorly timed sitcom humor

Netflix's 'Space Force' minimizes Trump's mistakes with poorly timed sitcom humor

The new Netflix series "Space Force" is a gentle, heartwarming comedy about our current political situation. Unfortunately, gentle, heartwarming comedies about our current political situation seem at best irrelevant and at worst immoral. The show stars Steve Carell as Gen. Mark R. Naird, a career military officer promoted to lead Space Force, a new branch of the service dedicated to the defense and militarization of space. President Donald Trump actually created a Space Force at the end of 2019, and the series pokes occasional fun at the (unnamed) president's petulance and un-spellchecked tweets. (He calls for "boobs on the moon," but they're pretty sure he means "boots on the moon.") Most of the plot, though, focuses on Naird's relationship with his chief scientist, Adrian Mallory (John Malkovich), as they try to get Space Force's satellites and crewed space station up and running. Off to the side, Naird's demanding job puts a strain on his relationship with his daughter, Erin (Diana Silvers), and his incarcerated wife, Maggie (Lisa Kudrow). Mark and Maggie's negotiation of their relationship is the best part of the series by far, and it makes you wish the show had focused on the family rather than the job. But workplace comedies are Carell's forte; he is best known for his portrayal of Michael Scott, the painfully self-absorbed and incompetent boss on "The Office." Carell's version of the character was notably more sympathetic than that of his counterpart, Ricky Gervais, in the U.K. version. "Space ...
More on: www.nbcnews.com