How coronavirus dramatically changed college for over 14 million students

How coronavirus dramatically changed college for over 14 million studentsHow coronavirus dramatically changed college for over 14 million students

Around the world, communities are taking drastic measures to curtail the spread of coronavirus. For many colleges and universities, that means canceling events, closing dorms and dramatically disrupting the lives of students and faculty. To date, at least 1,102 colleges and universities in the U.S. have closed their campuses due to coronavirus, choosing to move classes online. Georgetown professor Bryan Alexander estimates that college closures have impacted over 14 million students. "At least," he stresses. While students, professors, administrators and public health officials agree that school closures will play an important role in limiting the transmission of coronavirus, this bold move is causing a ripple effect throughout the higher education community. CNBC Make It spoke with over a dozen college students to hear how coronavirus is impacting them. On March 7, The University of Washington became the first large university in the U.S. to close its doors because of coronavirus. The school canceled in-person classes for its nearly 50,000 students and is having students take their exams remotely. Soon after, schools across the country followed suit. While each school has confronted coronavirus differently, many of the students Make It spoke with mentioned a typical pattern: rumors, followed by emails from administrators, followed by panic — despite the school administrators' best efforts. "It all escalated really quickly," Isabella Borshoff, a graduate student from Australia earning a master's degree in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, tells CNBC Make It, "I think the Kennedy School was one of the first ...
More on: www.cnbc.com