For Some, Necessary Isolation From Coronavirus Is Detrimental To Mental, Physical Health

For Some, Necessary Isolation From Coronavirus Is Detrimental To Mental, Physical Health

Social distancing and staying home have proven essential for flattening the coronavirus curve and minimizing harm from the virus, but research shows that these unprecedented guidelines to match our unprecedented times may negatively impact mental and physical health among Americans. According to a study in The Lancet, symptoms of post-traumatic stress, anger and heightened stress may come as side effects of the nationwide quarantine, and they may be long-lasting. Stressors for symptoms of poor mental health include lack of resources (medical and otherwise), extended quarantining, fears surrounding the virus, monetary loss, stigmatization of the illness and boredom. Lack of information and quarantining with no end in sight are also risk factors for declining mental health. But COVID-19 is unique in the high degree to which it also affects Americans behind the front lines. A study conducted by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network warns that, while the need for social distancing guidelines in this country is quite apparent, the effects of social isolation and being homebound could contribute to heightened suicide and overdose rates in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, racial minorities, particularly black and Hispanic people, are more likely to live in densely populated areas due to the effects of institutional racism and/or housing segregation. Because of this, they may have a harder time socially distancing. Almost a quarter of black and Hispanic workers are in the service industry or employed by businesses deemed essential during the quarantine, meaning they’re at higher ...
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