Don't Run Z490 Motherboards with Default Settings: Thermals, Power, Boosting, & MCE for 10th Gen CPUs

Don't Run Z490 Motherboards with Default Settings: Thermals, Power, Boosting, & MCE for 10th Gen CPUs

We’ve talked about Intel turbo and “Multi-Core Enhancement” many , many times in the past . This serves as a companion piece to the most recent of these, our “ Intel i9-10900K ‘High’ Power Consumption Explained ” video. To reiterate, Intel’s specification defines turbo limits--the multipliers for boosting on one core, two cores, etc, all the way up to an all-core turbo boost. Here are some examples from Coffee Lake’s launch (8700K) and before: It’s difficult to differentiate motherboards, at least from a marketing perspective. There are definitely better and worse boards, and you can check any of the roundups or reviews Buildzoid has produced for this channel for explanations as to why, but “better” doesn’t mean “higher FPS in games” here. Using higher-quality or more expensive components doesn’t always translate directly into running Fortnite at a higher framerate, which makes it harder to communicate to consumers why they should spend $200 on board X instead of $100 on board Y if both can run the same CPUs. This has led to motherboard manufacturers playing games with numbers for boost duration, voltages, BCLK, and other settings in order to differentiate their boards from the competition with tangible performance increases. For example, the 10900K’s max limited-core turbo multiplier is 53x and all-cores is 49x (when the CPU is operating below 70C). Breaking these turbo limits is considered overclocking. Intel also has guidelines for short-term power draw, long-term power draw, and boost duration. These variables are not part of the enforced spec, so breaking ...
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