Did UK Special Forces execute unarmed civilians?

Did UK Special Forces execute unarmed civilians?

At the height of the war in Afghanistan in 2011, two senior officers from Special Forces met in a bar in Dorset to have a secret conversation. They feared some of the UK's most highly-trained troops had adopted a "deliberate policy" of illegally killing unarmed men. Evidence is now emerging that suggests they were right. The two senior officers were thousands of miles from the dust and danger of Helmand province in Afghanistan. One had recently returned from the war where his troops reported their understanding that a policy of execution-style killings was being carried out by Special Forces. The other had been at headquarters, reading reports from the frontline with growing concern. They showed a sharp rise in the number of "enemies killed in action" (EKIA) by UK Special Forces. Special Forces are the UK's elite specialist troops, encompassing both the SAS (Special Air Service) and the SBS (Special Boat Service). After the conversation, a briefing note believed to have been written by one of the most senior members of UK Special Forces was passed up the chain of command. The message contained clear warnings for the highest levels of Special Forces and concluded that these "concerning" allegations merit "deeper investigation" to "at worst case put a stop to criminal behaviour". The documents were released to solicitors Leigh Day, as part of an ongoing case at the High Court, which will rule on whether allegations of unlawful killing by UK Special Forces were investigated properly. The man bringing the case is Saifullah ...
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